Sunday, February 16, 2020

Trolley Real Estate development in the 1920's!! Delco Sports legends book is out!!



A postcard of N. Lansdowne Ave. looking north toward Garrett Rd. The exact location is unknown. This picture is from about 1910 when Lansdowne was still a "little country town".




Note: The article below is from the early 1920's, when trolley lines ruled eastern Delaware County and contributed to the 1920's building boom. Trolleys left 69th St. Terminal at that time and ran on Chester Pike, MacDade Blvd., Baltimore Pk. and West Chester Pike etc. including the routes today. The building boom lasted till 1929 and the depression. Please visit the trolley page on my website, delawarecountyhistory.com for more information.



COUNTY BUILDING BOOM REAL

AID TO HOME BUYERS

Though Demand For Houses is Large, Prices Are Being Kept Down

 

 

          Prospective home buyers will reap the benefits of the big building boom which is now under way, according to the consensus of opinion among the big builders of the county.
         Notwithstanding the fact that the demand for homes at the present time is large, the number of homes going up all over the county is such that it will more than meet the demand.  In this way it is hoped to keep the prices of homes down to a level within the reach of the working man who is disposed to buy.
          It is the working man, more so than any other class of people, who is desirous of owning his home.  Not in many years, according to builders and real estate men, has the everyday working man put in so many applications for the purchase of homes, as is the case at the present time.
          Building and loan associations will also vouch for this statement, and the demand on these organizations for loans has been such that a number of new associations have been founded and conducted profitably.
          The amount of building in the eastern end of the county, especially Upper Darby Township, continues at an exceedingly brisk pace.  Large tracts of what was formerly farm land are being developed as fast as grades are established and excavations made.  South of Bywood, on the big tract which runs from that community to the property line of St. Vincent’s Home, at the corner of Lansdowne Avenue and Garrett Road, one of the biggest building operations in the Township is now under way.  There is already a small town adjoining Bywood known as Beverly Hill, and so rapidly have the homes on this development been bought up and occupied that the Philadelphia and West Chester Traction Company has established a stop at the point, bearing the name of the development.
          Right on down to the small stream known as Naylor’s Run, and up the Orphanage property line, operations are continuing.  Many big old trees had to be cut down and the stumps dynamited to make way for the building.
          Streets are being cut through and all improvements, including cub and gutters are being laid as fast as the concrete is mixed.
          With the completion of the work on Garrett Road from Sixty-Ninth Street to Lansdowne Avenue, it is expected that the large tracts abutting on the east side of the thoroughfare will soon witness big building operations.  This land is selling high, the old Powers estate, directly in the rear of the Upper Darby Township building is reported to be held for $20,000 per acre.
          ACTIVITIES IN LANSDOWNE – In Lansdowne the erect ion of new homes is still continuing with slight change, despite the fact that many of Lansdowne erstwhile vacant tracts are now adorned with beautiful homes.
          One of the big operations is that of W. Percival Johnson on Baltimore Avenue west of Windermere Avenue.
          Here the old building known as the “Windermere” and which stood for many years in a frightfully dilapidated condition, is undergoing alterations of a most extensive character, and is rapidly taking on the appearance of an entirely new building which is practically will be when completed.
          The old structure is being remodeled into an apartment house and according to reports, there will be nice, large and roomy apartments within its four walls.
          A street has been cut through off Baltimore Avenue, south towards the railroad, and abutting on this new thoroughfare.  Builder Johnson plans to erect a number of pretty homes.
          At a cost of approximately $250,000, the new Rolling Green Golf Club, situated on State Road above Springfield Road, in Springfield Township, will be laid out.  Work on the new project has already been started and will be pushed through as rapidly as possible.  The property of 177 acres was recently sold by John J. Dougherty of Sixty-Ninth Street to a number of Delaware County golf lovers.  The course will consist of 18 holes with what is expected to be the largest and most beautiful clubhouse in the county.
          OPERATIONS IN MEDIA – Media is witnessing more building now than has ever been seen before in the town’s history.  New operations and alterations to old properties are going on almost unceasingly, and the county seat community is rapidly growing, both in the number of its homes as well as population.
          Probably the largest building is the new apartment house going up on the corner of Olive and Jasper Streets, owned by W. Roger Fronefield and Howard M. Lutz, prominent lawyers.
          Owen T. Hughes owns the garage building and apartment which is now being completed at the corner of Baltimore Pike and Providence Road.
          George Schuchardt expects to remove into his new barber shop on Orange Street about Christmas.  The operation, which was begun a few weeks ago, it is understood, is an outlay of $10,000.
          The Estate Development Company has renewed operations at Pine Ridge, laying sewers and cutting through streets.
          J. W. Holton’s new homes on Lincoln Street at the foot of Orange Street, near Media station, are almost completed, there are about a dozen homes in this group.
          Lavin Brothers are erecting two houses of two stories each on East Franklin Street near Providence Road.
          Edward Snyder is building on South Avenue between Jefferson Street and Franklin Street.
          Samuel Rhodes’ operation plans to erect fifteen new homes on his tract on Manchester Avenue.
          James J. Boyer is building an apartment house and store building on East State Street.  There will be five rooms in the apartment.
          Plans are now being completed for the new Wallingford Junior High School on Allen’s Hill overlooking the lower end of Nether Providence Township.  Work on the new institution will be begun just as soon as possible.


 The Sports Legends of Delaware County (SLDC) Museum will hold a series of Delaware County library presentations for their recently published book,

 “Tales From the Museum.”

The purpose of the book is to recognize the athletic excellence of Delaware County athletes, and to preserve its sports heritage.

Below is a list of dates and locations for these events.
 
        Wednesday February 19 Ridley Township Library 6:30 pm
         Sunday February 23 Upper Darby Sellers Library 3 pm
  • Wednesday February 26 Haverford Library 7 pm
  • Tuesday March 3 Darby Free Library 7 pm
  • Wednesday March 4 Norwood Library 6:30 pm
  • Thursday March 5 Marple Library 7 pm
  • Monday March 9 Middletown Library 7 pm
 
If you have questions, contact




Sunday, February 9, 2020

Delco Growth 100 years ago along with 667 Farms!! Upcoming events!!

Even in the 1920's Media was trying to keep it's farm appeal alive. A unknown farm in the Media area. A postcard from the 1920's. Look below for a great State St. Media picture.

 

Note: One hundred years ago Delaware Co. was growing by leaps and bounds. Railroads and trolley lines were opening up areas that had been farms for hundreds of years. Towns were springing up everywhere. BUT at the same time there was still 667 farms in Delco. Working Farms!!! Please read both articles and look at all the pictures. Keith

 
 

In the 1920's Upper Darby Twp. still had plenty of open ground, look in the background of this picture. I do not know where this greenhouse was in Secane, looking for some help. Thanks Keith

 
 

FARM ACREAGE IN MUCH DEMAND

Home Development Along Sixty-Ninth Street to Media Increases

          Gradually the farm acreage lying along the Media Short Line from Sixty-Ninth Street to Media is being bought up for home development.  Even now there is very little acreage left in this area which is not held either by spectators or suburban home operators with a keen eye to the future.  If the trend of real estate development holds its present in-country direction and transformation in a decade more the stretch from Media into Sixty-Ninth Street will become an unbroken line of suburban dwelling.  Already the Sixty-Ninth Street construction development is linking up with that of Bywood, and Bywood is stretching out its neighborly hand to welcome across Naylor’s run to Drexel Hill, and Drexel Hill is spreading onward to the Springfields, and the Springfields are destined to link up with Media, perfecting the annealing process in this interurban chain.
          Within the territory lying between Baltimore Pike and the Media Short Line right of way to Media very little acreage remains under actual farm cultivation.  There is acreage a-plenty, of course, but in the real estate man’s parlance, it is mostly tied up and salted away by developers and speculators awaiting its turn to be placed upon the market in small allotments of home sites.  The latest sale of this farming land was made public Friday of last week when the Jacob Schoch farm of sixty-three acres changed its ownership.  Frank Lawyer, Bywood, and Mr. O’Rourke, Newtown Square, associated with a Philadelphia syndicate, purchased this acreage.  The consideration is not given, but the purpose of the purchasers is given as speculative.  The Jacob Schoch farm lies on both sides of Bishop Avenue, in the Addingham district, south of the Aronimink Golf Club holdings, and is accessible from the Baltimore Pike or State Road.
 

State St at South Ave. looking East about 1926. If you look close at the sidewalks, you can still see places to tie up your horses for visiting farmers

 

 

 

 

LIST 667 FARMS IN THIS COUNTY

Total Farm Population Is 3269, and Acreage Is computed at 42,125

The second triennial farm census recently completed in Delaware County, shows 667 farms, 565 of which are operated by owners, eighty-six by tenants, and sixteen by managers, according to L. H. Wible, director, Bureau of Statistics, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The county has a total farm population of 3269, according to the census, and a total acreage in farms of 42,125, of which 14,249 is used for the principal field crops.  The acreage devoted to these crops is as follows:  Corn for grain, 3282; for silage and fodder, 963; wheat, 1661; Oats, 1,144; rye, 62; potatoes, 601; alfalfa hay, 1,612; all other tame hay, 4,924.
The extent of fruit growing is indicated by 23,729 apple trees of bearing age and 13,954 of non-bearing age, 21,416 peach trees of all ages, and 6532 pear trees of all ages.
The livestock industry is represented by 1,409 horses including colts, 100 mules including mule colts, 3,760 milk cows and heifers, two years old and over, 551 heifers, one to two years old, 723 other cattle and calves, 580 sows and gilts for breeding, 2,681 other swine, and 917 sheep and lambs.
The count shows 43,041 hens and pullets of laying age, 19,277 other chickens, and 178 hives of bees.
Modern equipment and conveniences on farms are as follows:  396 farm homes have running water in kitchen and 346 have furnace heating systems.  The farms have 11 milking machines in use, 671 automobiles, 321 trucks, 127 tractors, 254 gas engines, 342 telephones, 320 radios, and 119 silos, 27 of the farms have their own electric plants, and 301 receive electricity from a power station.
 

 The Sports Legends of Delaware County (SLDC) Museum will hold a series of Delaware County library presentations for their recently published book, “Tales From the Museum.”

The purpose of the book is to recognize the athletic excellence of Delaware County athletes, and to preserve its sports heritage.
Below is a list of dates and locations for these events.
  • Saturday February 1 Crozer Chester Library 1 pm
  • Wednesday February 5 Radnor Library 7 pm
  • Thursday February 6 Prospect Park Library 7 pm
  • Thursday February 13 Folcroft Library 6 pm
  • Wednesday February 19 Ridley Township Library 6:30 pm
  • Sunday February 23 Upper Darby Sellers Library 3 pm
  • Wednesday February 26 Haverford Library 7 pm
  • Tuesday March 3 Darby Free Library 7 pm
  • Wednesday March 4 Norwood Library 6:30 pm
  • Thursday March 5 Marple Library 7 pm
  • Monday March 9 Middletown Library 7 pm
 
If you have questions, contact
Jim Vankoski, President of the SLDC Museum
610-909-4919

What do Cadbury Chocolate, The Jersey Devil, and the 18th century transgender preacher known as the Public Universal Friend have in common? 

They were all born Quakers!  This lecture will review the lives of some famous Quakers like Lucretia Mott and Bayard Rustin, as well as less well-known Friends and some  "Friendly" almost-Quakers.

To learn about this and much more, join Aston Township Historical Society in welcoming local historian Celia Caust-Ellenbogen of the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College on Thursday, February 13th, 2020, at 7 PM.  Doors open at 6:30 PM so you can enjoy the new displays featuring the many interesting Women of Aston and the patriotic Veterans from Aston at the Aston Township Community Center located at 3270 Concord Road, Aston, PA 19064.
This event is free and open to the public.  However donations are always welcomed.  Ask about their volunteer opportunities, too!  In case of a snow storm, the event will be rescheduled.









Sunday, February 2, 2020

Plush Mill Bridge opens! Upcoming events and Delco Spoorts Legends new book!!

The Plush Mill aka Memorial Bridge on Baltimore Pike about 1950. You are looking east toward Springfield Twp. across Crum Creek. The bridge opened in 1924 but was not dedicated till 1926.

 
 

NOTE: It is hard to imagine today that Baltimore Pike was THE route to go to Baltimore and Washington D.C. etc. before I-95 was built. Baltimore Pike was a two lane highway till 1958, when it was widened to four lanes. On the inside of this Memorial Bridge were two plaques to honor the dead from Delaware Co. in World War 1. When the bridge was widened , the plaques were put in storage for almost 60 years. They were re-erected at the entrance to Smedley Park in Springfield Twp. where you can see them today. The names on the two plaques are below. Please forgive any miss-spellings the newspaper was hard to read.

 
 
 

PLUSH MILL MEMORIAL SPAN OPENED TO PUBLIC TRAFFIC

 Last Detour of County Wiped out This Morning When Barrier is Let Down on $200,000 Bridge 

Hundreds of Autos Inaugurate Travel

          The Victoria Plush Mill Bridge, situated over Crum Creek, Swarthmore, was thrown open to travel this morning and the early hours of its career witnessed hundreds of machines passing over it.  The barriers were taken down last night but it was not until day break today that the structure was given its initial tryout by the public.
          The bridge was erected at a cost of approximately $200,000.  The contract price for the bridge alone was $180,000, the extras bringing the total cost to $200,000.
          The span was designed by County Engineer R. J. Aydlotte and stands out as one of the most beautiful concrete structures in this section of the country.  Work on the bridge was commenced in the spring of last year.  With the opening of the new bridge one of the county’s worst danger points has been eliminated.  Persons who passed over it by machine this morning found that the former curve on the west side had been done away with and that the grade leading to the bridge proper had been cut to about eight per cent.  It also removes the last detour in the county, one of the worst that local and touring drivers had to contend with.
These tablets, which are the largest of their kind in the United States, contain the names of two hundred and eighty men and two women and are fifteen feet high and eight feet in width.
          The bridge on which they are hung was erected as a memorial to those who gave their lives in defense of their country.  It was erected at a contract price of approximately $387,000, is two hundred and forty feet in length and has a roadway forty feet wide, with two five feet sidewalks.  The bridge was designed by R. J. Aydlotte, who has since died and the memorial arch was designed by Clarence W. Brazer.
          NAMES ON THE TABLETS – The list of names which appears on the tablets are as follows:  Charles Aikens, Harold Ainsworth, Thomas Clark Allen, Antonio Areco, Frederick W. Bense, Joseph Boshell, Frank T. Barnes, William Batesman, Walter E. Beaumen, Herbert W. Best, John B. Block, Clarence H. Blythe, George W. Booth, James Bradley, Harry Brown, Raymond G. Brown, Harry Brush, Clarence F. Buckalew, William Buley, Claude Burrell, Darrell W. Byerly, Eugene B. Eyre, Johnson D. Carr, James L. Carr, Vincenzo Catini, Giuseppe Ceccarelli, Collins Chambers, George Chessolosky William McK Childs, Harry M. Clifford, Stanton H. Cloud, Madeline Cloud, William Powell Colter, James W. Conway, Edmund G. Cook, Julius K. Counchill, DeWitt C. Cowan, Walter Arnson Craneer, Jacob H. Cranfield, John W. Cross, Pentelione Cucinotte, William W. Cunningham, Roy C. Davidson, George Henry Dean, Earl N. Dehmer, Amos E. Deiter, John A. Delaney, Paul Dewnegre, William P. Derrickson, Altorende Dicarlo, Charles A. Dick, Wallace Craig Dickson, Alexander Limeulo, Fransaico Dibetino, William B. Dixon, John Dowling, John Doyle, George D. Dreslin, Clyde Duffieled, Howard Reyduncki, Graham E. Elder, Lawrence J. Emmertz, Howard Evans, Eugene C. Everhart, Gardner Fairlamb, Charles A. Farr, George Farrell, L. Faulkner, Clarence P. Ferguson, Lewis Howard Fielding, Charlie Fids, Anthony Finnocchio, Thomas J. Flennery, William Fleming, James Ford, John Ford, William C. Foreaker, Clarence Freeman, Paul Fullerton, Edward Gallagher, Joseph M. Gardner, Fizzi Garlane, Nicola Gioncatarino, Robert Fullerton Gordon, Paul Grense, Harry J. Grant William C. Grelfzu, Oscar G. Greip, Norman B. Hallman, Edward R. Hemer, Arthur R. Henling, John Harkins, William F. Harkins, Howard Hartley, Richard Hartley, Frederick Hawthorne, James L. Heagerty, Louis R. Heath, Hugh J. Herr, Alfred J. Higgins, Jefferies Higgins, John J. Hoffecker, John Hienski, George B. Hoffman, Harry Holladay, Otis Holmes, Carl T. Holt, Robert W. Holt, Jr., Awerko Holuszczek, Charles H. Horsey, Herman L. Hughes, Walter J. Hunter, Lewis E. Ingham, Grace Ireland, Willis Jackson, Wilford W. Jefferies, Mike Jeswmils, Alfred Lee Johnson, Rudolph M. Johnson, Mercer S. Johnston, Samuel Irvin Jopy, John Kadinski, Ernest Kaufman, Anthony Kazlewski, William J. Keher, Andrew J. Kennedy, Warren Kirk, James L. Killen, Joseph King, James E. King, Langston Kirk, Frank Kolsolike, William G. Kork, John Klrumboldt, Leroy Latto, Hewitt Lawrence, Charlie Laxton, Harry Lazaruk, Rufus Earl Leach, John J. Leary, Norman Leonard, Lafayette Liechetti, Robert Logan, Joseph T. Long, William Loveland, Wilson Loyd, Anthony Lukaitis, Edmund W. Lynch, Serafino Maeri, John  McGinnes, Walter Madenford, Joseph F. Maher, George H. Majilton, Henry B. Major, Gennarlo Malgee, Wilmer N. Mannering, Lorn F. Mason, Thomas T. Mason, William E. Magee, William J. Meizner, Howard Melody, Henry S. Michell, 2nd, Jesse Miller, Benny Miller, James W. Miller, William R. Miller, Philip Oyerton Mills, Walter S. Mitchell, Benjamin S. Mock, G. R. Monroe, Gormley J. Montgomery, William L. Mooney, William D. Moore, Clarence Mortland, Harry J. Mosley, Joseph A. Mullin, Thomas McAndrews, John McBride, John A. McDevitt, George C. McDonald, Robert McKeige, John McKenna, Arthur J. McKinney, William McLean, James W. McMeekin, Edward F. McShane, Howard H. McVaugh, Frank Neroni, Clinton VanPewlt Newboldt, James Newsome, Philip M. Norbeck, William L. Numan, Joseph O’Dirrisio, William Francis O’Hara, James Oliver, Wendell Osborne, Jr., Pasqual Palumbo, Samuel Panasaik, Norman S. Phillips, Joseph E. Pierce, Theodore Pistikoudis, Richard Henry Pittsa, Thomas Robert Reath, Horace Regent, John P. Reilly, George H. Righter, Caetano Rizza, Harry G. Robinson, Jr., Richard J. Rorke, Benjamin Rosenberger, Carlo Rossi, Anthony Ronthkowski, Alexander L. Ruddock, Paul Clinton Rudolph, David Rupp, 3rd, Joseph A. Ryan, Wedan Rywicki, Benjamin Sabatino, Jacob Sahckem, Joseph X. Saunders, Edward Sauers, William C. Savill, Casper G. Schroeder, William H. S. Shultz, Domenico Scialle, Francesco Sciamume, Genneco Sciplone, Alexander Scott, Edge T. Scott, Louis Sorebuno, Thomas Martin Shaw, David J. Shields, Howard L. Simcox, DeForrest Willard Skilling, Clayton T. Smith, William Clyde Smith, William F. Smith, John Sottile, Charles Spence, William H. Spence, Earl B. Staley, Theodore W. Stein, Alfred Stevenson, Frank W. Stevenson, Ellsworth Stokes, George V. Stuart, Frank F. Sullivan, Walter Syzamanski, Finley R. Taylor, Herbert M. Taylor, Soccorso Tecce, Stephen Terzzito, Roy Thomas, Albert L. Thompson, William Harry Thorpe, Rufus Tolson, Camillo Traino, Toney Trongonew, Thomas A. Veneman, Fillipo  Antonio Vivole, Stephen W. Wondersmith, Frank R. Walker, Jesse H. Walker, John Walsh, Peter A. Warsewiez, Percy Wetmuff, Albert A. Watson, Raymond W. Watson, Pennington H. Way, John W. Wetgel, Raymond Whelanhan, Edwin S. Williams, James C. Wilson, Maurice F. Witmer, Charles E. Worrell, Charles Wright, Albert C. Wunderlich, Lewis Worrall Yarnall, Jr., James Yost, James Zane, Daniel W. Zeising.
 
 
 

What do Cadbury Chocolate, The Jersey Devil, and the 18th century transgender preacher known as the Public Universal Friend have in common?  They were all born Quakers!  This lecture will review the lives of some famous Quakers like Lucretia Mott and Bayard Rustin, as well as less well-known Friends and some  "Friendly" almost-Quakers.

To learn about this and much more, join Aston Township Historical Society in welcoming local historian Celia Caust-Ellenbogen of the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College on Thursday, February 13th, 2020, at 7 PM.  Doors open at 6:30 PM so you can enjoy the new displays featuring the many interesting Women of Aston and the patriotic Veterans from Aston at the Aston Township Community Center located at 3270 Concord Road, Aston, PA 19064.

This event is free and open to the public.  However donations are always welcomed.  Ask about their volunteer opportunities, too!  In case of a snow storm, the event will be rescheduled.
 
 
 

The Heritage Commission of Delaware County presents:

Finding your Delco Roots:

 

Free Genealogy Seminar


 
Speakers:
· Barbara Selletti, genealogist· Margaret Jerrido & Judith Giesberg, Last Seen: Using Information Conduct African American Genealogy Wanted Ads to
· Sarah Horowitz, Quaker and Special Collections, Haverford College

Saturday, March 28, 2020
8:30 am - 12 pm
County Council Meeting Room
First Floor, Government Center
Media, PA 19063
Light breakfast included
delcoplanning.ticketleap.com/heRreitgaigstee-rc oatm: mission-2020-annual-seminar
 
 
 

Sports Legends of Delaware County (SLDC)  is excited to launch its first-ever book, "Tales from the Museum: A Collaborative Anthology" celebrating 20 years since the museum first opened and traces the stories behind its different locations, athletes, and events. A timeless gift for anyone interested in sports or local history!

The book is available for individual purchase at $35. With a donation of $50, become a Friend of SLDC Museum with name recognition on our website and receive the book with free shipment included. To place an order request, please email Jim Vankoski at  vankoski21@comcast.net or call 610-909-4919.

Payment can be made through our home page at  www.delcosportsmuseum.org through the donate link using PayPal, credit or debit card, or please send a check made payable to: SLDC Museum and mail to 301 Iven Avenue Radnor, PA 19087. Orders will ship once the book order arrives! SLDC is a non-profit 501c3 organization. 

 
 


Sunday, January 26, 2020

Ever heard of "Lindy Park" ? Named for Atlantic Ocean flyer Charles Lindbergh?

The Governor Johan Printz Monument in Governor Printz Park in Essington at Second and Wanamaker Aves.

NOTE: I was quite surprised when I found this article the Lindbergh/Printz Park in Essington. After crossing the Atlantic Ocean in 1927, Lindbergh went on a world tour. He visited Phila and Delaware Co. including flying over Chester City which was front page news. The naming of the park was a surprise. I have never heard Lindbergh in the parks name.

 
 
 
 

CHESTER TIMES – October 19, 1927 

 

COUNTY PARK NAMED FOR LINDY

 Plot on Tinicum Island Honors Flier and Former Swedish Governor

          On the eve of Charles A. Lindbergh’s arrival in Philadelphia, the Swedish Colonial Society of Philadelphia announced today the establishment of Printz-Lindbergh Park, a pleasure place named to honor jointly a Swede, who was the first white settler in Pennsylvania, and the American youth of Swedish blood who made history by flying the Atlantic.
          From a historical viewpoint the oldest parcel of land in Pennsylvania the seven-acre park is situated on Tinicum Island, in this county.
          Although this grounded was offered to the Swedish Society some months ago and accepted shortly after, it was not until last week that the land actually became its own.  Several days ago the deed was transferred by the Tinicum Improvement Company, which held title to Tinicum property, for Charles Longstreth, of Coronado, Cal., the donor, to five trustees for the Swedish Colonial Society.
          SPROUL ON BOARD – The members of the board are Colonel Henry D. Paxon, Dr. Thomas Lynch Montgomery, Major David S. B. Chew, former Governor Sproul and Ormond Rambo, Jr.
          It was upon the Tinicum Island tract that the first white settlers of Pennsylvania established a permanent residence, one year before William Penn was born and thirty-nine years before he came to this country.  That was in 1643.
          Governor Johan Printz, Provincial Governor of New Sweden (now Delaware), was the first great Swede to help establish this country in the eyes of the world, and Lindbergh is the latest man with Swedish blood in his veins to being the United States before the nations.  That is why the society thought that no name would be as appropriate for this historical site as Printz-Lindbergh Park.
          Lindbergh’s topics principally in the interest of aviation it was thought inadvisable to ask him to officiate at a formal dedication of the park at present, as there would be little time on his crowded program.  The society plans to seek his early return for this ceremony.
          EXPECT LINDY AT CEREMONY – According to Colonel Paxon, president of the Colonial Swedish Society, the Board of Trustees is virtually certain that both the donor of Printz-Lindbergh Park.  Mr. Longstreth and Lindbergh, will be on hand when the date is set to dedicate the ground.
          The five men representing the Swedish Society have not yet decided what will be done with the seven acres besides transforming it into a park.  There is a large residence on the grounds, which has been leased and is being used as a roadhouse.  A pavilion, barn and several other buildings are also on the grounds.
          The lease does not terminate for another year, so plans for renovation will not be completed for some time.  It was suggested that a reproduction of Governor Printz’s home be erected, but the only plans the builders have to follow is that the house was, entirely of logs and was two stories high.
          When Mr. Longstreth offered the estate to the society, it was stated the ground was five acres.  A recent survey shows it to be seven acres.
          The Corinthian Yacht Club adjoins the grounds on one side, a boat construction company on the other, and the Delaware River runs along the front.  Second Street bounds the estate in the rear.
 
 
 


 
 



 
 
 
 
The Heritage Commission of Delaware County presents:
Finding Your Delco Roots

 
Free Genealogy Seminar


Speakers:
· Barbara Selletti, genealogist

· Margaret Jerrido & Judith Giesberg, Last Seen: Using Information Conduct African American Genealogy Wanted Ads to
· Sarah Horowitz, Quaker and Special Collections, Haverford College

Saturday, March 28, 2020
8:30 am - 12 pm
County Council Meeting Room
First Floor, Government Center
Media, PA 19063
Light breakfast included
delcoplanning.ticketleap.com/heRreitgaigstee-rc oatm: mission-2020-annual-seminar/
 
 

Sunday, January 19, 2020

The West Chester To Phila. Railroad Line 140 years ago and Upcoming Activities!!

The original Railroad Station in Lansdowne from about 1900. The current station is in the same location.

 
 

The West Chester Railroad from the Phila. Border to Media in 1880

 

Note: This article talks about a train ride on the then new line from Phila. to West Chester a 140 years ago. Delaware Co. was just starting to grow as a Phila. suburb but it was still mostly farm country. Several of the railroad stations in this article are renamed now. Angora is now Millbourne and Springhill is Secane. Please read and take a ride back!! 

 
 
      Real estate all along the road is steadily growing in value.  Buildings in course of erection or structure bearing marks of newness are to be seen on both sides of the road, from Philadelphia almost to Media.  Many new and handsome private residences are springing up along the line of the track, capacious barns and cattle sheds just finished or with the builders at work upon them are to be seen, and not a few extensive mills are being erected or having large additions made.  The land even quite remote from the city brings a very high figure.
                Not only has each station some interesting improvement to show, but between the regular stopping places the progress is almost as distinctly marked.  Abbottsford, the first stopping place shows a cluster of small houses in the vicinity of the station, the growth of recent years.  Angora has been still more progressive.  Opposite the railroad station is the Church Home for Children.  Here are also George Callahan’s Angora Mills, of which a new section has been built.  The Messrs. Callahan have erected here three handsome new residences.  Quite a little town has sprung up in Angora in late years.  The next station on the route is Fernwood.  The large new building on the north side of the track showing so conspicuously from the railroad is the Fernwood Hotel, for summer boarders, which is owned, it is said, by the Masonic Order.  Building lots are for sale at and near Fernwood, and bring prices ranging from five to seven thousand dollars per acre.
                Lansdowne, or the old Darby Road Station, is about three-quarters of a mile below Fernwood.  It has undergone many and striking improvements in the last five or six years.  The railroad house at the station has been enlarged and improved, and the grounds more neatly arranged.  Fine summer residences have been recently built here and the surrounding acres much beautified.  Joel J. Baily, the Philadelphia merchant, has a fine summer residence at Lansdowne, and nearby is the residence of Mr. Samuel Harlan, of the shipbuilding firm of Harlan & Hollingsworth.  Messrs. James P. Scott, the son and Howell W. Bickley, own and occupy handsome villas and about a mile and a half further south, towards Darby, is “Woodburn,” the summer residence and park of Colonel Scott, where he died in May last.  Mr. Harry Peale, of the firm of Thomas A. Biddle & Co., stock brokers and Rene Guillou own properties at Lansdowne.  Ten acres of the Dunk property, nearby, have just been purchased by a Philadelphia gentleman, for a thousand dollars an acre, most probably for immediate building purposes.  Real estate near Lansdowne brings from one to two thousand dollars per acre.
                Kellyville is a small station further west.  There are several fine residences nearby, and a number of valuable bustling properties, principally woolen mills.  A new shoddy mill, the property of Sellers Hoffman, is in course of erection.
Clifton proper has been increased by the addition of a number of houses, one or two churches have been built, and the place wears a thriving, prosperous look.  Here are the Glenwood Mills, owned by Samuel C. Lewis & Sons; the Clifton Mills by Randolph & Jenks and the Union Mills, by Thomas Kent.  Among the recent sales of property at Clifton were about twenty acres of land belonging Oborne Levis’ estate, to Wm. Longstreth of Philadelphia, for about $16,000.  Few building improvements or land sales have been made at Oak Lane recently.  Here is situated Dr. Given’s Inebriate Asylum.
                Property is in demand at Spring Hill.  W. J. Howard, Esq., has just purchased a farm of fifty acres on the north side, near the station.  Mr. James D. Rhodes occupies a fine residence on the hill.  Many old time mansions and landmarks are to be seen hereabouts.
                Morton station is conspicuous by reason of a handsome pressed brick railroad house, one of the neatest along the road.  Several buildings, principally private residences or annexes thereto, are being erected.  Thomas T. Tasker owns 600 acres here, with a fine residence and barn.  J. H. Irwin has just purchased 80 acres at Morton for about $300 per acre, and has erected a new hotel near the station, fitted up with has, &c.  At the time of his purchase Mr. Irwin owned 70 acres, nearly adjoining the new territory, and has a large machine shop there.  H. A. Bregoard is another large property owner at Morton.  He owns one hundred acres thereabouts, which he is daily improving.  Dr. Kingston Goddard, ex-Coroner of Philadelphia, owns a handsome property lying near the railroad.  The J. Edgar Thomson estate owns about 160 acres near Morton, fronting on the Delaware County Pike and near the railroad.  Handsome residences, built after the Swiss chalet style of architecture, adorn nearly all of the properties named, which have undergone vast improvement within a few years.  The old Morton homestead stands back some distance from the railroad station.
                Swarthmore is the name of the next station on the West Chester Road.  The college is the most conspicuous public object hereabouts.  The spirit of improvement shows itself about the institution as well as generally along the road, and during the last two or three years important changes have been made, notably the long and broad sweep of pathway running from the railroad to the college building. 
     The high hill in the distance is dotted with several handsome new stone houses, the residences of a number of the college professors.  The West Hill Land Company has purchased two hundred acres adjoining the college property on the east.  Their acreage is all high and health land.  The company is effecting many improvements in the vicinity of Swarthmore. On the hill a large water works is being erected.  Thomas Foulke, Prof. Beardsley and S. Kent occupy fine houses at Swarthmore, and Sylvester Garrett is erecting for himself a valuable residence.  Nearly all the property lying hereabout belongs or originally belonged to the John Ogden family.  J. H. Linville, President of the Keystone Bridge Company, and President of the new Southern Maryland Railroad, has a fine residence on the south side of the road.  So also has Mr. Callender I. Leiper, of the firm of Leiper & Lewis, who own the stone quarries near Swarthmore, of the stone of which nearly all the new houses in the neighborhood are built.  An interesting relic of other days is built.  An interesting relic of other days is the old cottage on the college grounds, which was the birthplace and for many years the home of the painter, Benjamin West.  It is in the center of a small orchard, and has every appearance of age.  Real estate at Swarthmore ranges in value from $500 to $1000 per acre.  East of Swarthmore Charles Ogden has built tow handsome residences, and Henry Ogden has a fine residence on the Delaware County Turnpike.
                Wallingford is distinguished for its many fine residences.  Directly opposite the station, on the north side, is the residence of Horace Howard Furness, Esq.   The mansion is very large and handsome.  Mr. Furness’ property embraces some 65 acres, and contains another residence besides that named.  Three acres were recently purchased by Mr. Furness at the rate of a thousand dollars per acre.  S. D. Hibbert has a handsome house with a new stable at Wallingford.  Among the other fine properties or new residences here are those of D. B. Paul, President of the Third National Bank; James Spear, the stove manufacturer of Philadelphia, who has just purchased thirty additional acres has just purchased thirty additional acres from Samuel C. Lewis; C. W. Godfrey, of the firm of Drexel & Co., who occupies a handsome stone house, with a tract of eighteen acres; Henry P. Dixon, of the firm of Thomas S. Dixon & Sons, who has just purchased nine acres of the Miskey property for $15,000.  Two acres of an adjoining property were recently sold for a thousand dollars an acre.  Louis Drake has eleven acres near Wallingford, with a modern style of house; Isaac Lewis, proprietor of the Wallingford Mills, has a farm of sixty-four acres, worth, it is said, $500 per acre; J. Howard Lewis owns six hundred acres fronting on the pike, which, at this point, is about a mile to the south of the railroad track.  Samuel C. Lewis, George C. Howard, J. Edward Farnum, ex-President of the West Chester Road, Isaac L. Miller and M. Kershaw own properties varying in size, lying at or near Wallingford.  Many of these properties front on the old Providence Road, which runs from Chester due north to Media.  This road was laid out by William Penn’s Commissioners in 1682, and many old line marks are still standing.  Nearly all of the properties named are undergoing improvements of some kind or other, and, with the growth of this popular station, proportionately increase in value. 
                From Wallingford to Manchester, and indeed to Media, are many desirable building lots, with high and healthy grounds, large water power from Ridley Creek, and many other local advantages.  Prices hereabouts range from $400 to $800 per acre.  One of the largest landowners near Media is Sam Bancroft, proprietor of the Todmorden Mills.  Several large sales of available building slots have recently been made in and about Media for good prices.
                Along the line of the road, even as far as West Chester, the march of improvement is marked at times, but the chief improvement in recent years has been between West Philadelphia and Media.

The Rose Valley Museum at Thunderbird Lodge will be open the weekend of January 18 and 19 from noon until 4pm.
41 Rose Valley Road

Rose Valley, PA 19063
Enjoy a step back to early 1900’s.
Tour upper and lower studios, living room and dining room.
Permanent collection on display in upper studio.
Exhibit of papers of Mildred Scott Olmsted.
Display/sale of F. Townsend Morgan prints in the living room.
Admission: Free to members; $10 per person, 7 and up
Purchase tickets online (click here)
Please choose the appropriate date when purchasing tickets.
 
 
 
The Heritage Commission of Delaware County presents:
Finding Your Delco Roots
 
Free Genealogy Seminar

Speakers:
· Barbara Selletti, genealogist
· Margaret Jerrido & Judith Giesberg, Last Seen: Using Information Conduct African American Genealogy Wanted Ads to
· Sarah Horowitz, Quaker and Special Collections, Haverford College
Saturday, March 28, 2020
8:30 am - 12 pm
County Council Meeting Room
First Floor, Government Center
Media, PA 19063
Light breakfast included
delcoplanning.ticketleap.com/heRreitgaigstee-rc oatm: mission-2020-annual-seminar/