Monday, August 19, 2019

Glen Mills Paper Mill closes Upcoming mill talks and tours see below

A very early rare aerial view of the Glen Mills paper mills before they closed in 1922. Ruins can still be seen along Chester Creek. Lots of mill talks and tours this Fall, see below.

 

NOTE:

      I will be given 2 tours September 7 at the Victorian Fair. One at 11am and the other at 1pm. Tour will cover parts of Swarthmore and Sellers Ave. and take about one hour. Price ten dollars. We will start at the old Wells Fargo Bank parking lot. I only take about 10 or 12 people on each tour so let me know if you would like to go. Just send me an email at keith106@rcn.com and I will add you to the list. You can register on September 7, but space may be limited. Thanks Keith

:

 
 
September 5, 1922

GLEN MILLS PAPER MILLS A MEMORY

 Plant Being Dismantled and Machinery Moved Elsewhere


                It now looks, reports a correspondent, as though the Glen Mills Paper Mills will soon be only a memory of industrial life in that section of Delaware County, the Chester Creek Valley.  The big paper plant has been shut down for several months, but now the machinery is being removed and shipped away and the place dismantled, which would seem to indicate that the Glen Mills Paper Mill will soon be a thing of the past.

                For many years this industry was operated day and night, and was always a hive of industry, providing employment to a small army of contented workers, most of whom live in tenement houses on the premises.  The Glenn Mills Paper Mill was built in 1838 by James M. Willcox who was at that time operating the paper mill at Ivy Mills, built by his ancestors in 1729.  In this factory at Glen Mills was made all the paper used in making currency and bonds for the United States Government, for Mr. Willcox had invented a secret process in making paper which made counterfeiting very difficult.  So great was the success of this new invention that the government had many guards and secret service men on duty all the time at Glen Mills, to prevent any tampering or loss through any of the paper getting into other hands.  Orders were also turned out for foreign governments, and until the Willcox paper was improved upon by the New England mills, all the paper money in this country was made at Glen Mills.

                So great was the demand for it that another mill was built there, but that has fallen into ruin from disuse many years ago.  When the Glen Mills mills were built in 1836, there was more paper made in Delaware County than in all the rest of the United States combined.  The natural water power and clear water made this creek the source of the country’s paper supply. 
The present Yorkshire Mills were then making paper, John B. Duckett being then the maker.  It was he who built the present big mansion now on the premises.  The West Branch mills were also then operated by the Mattsons, as a paper mill.

                For the past twenty-five years the Glen Mills paper mills had been conducted by the Dohans, under the trade name of Glen Mills Paper Company, whose offices are in the Drexel buildings in Philadelphia.  Its last product was a patent parchment paper, used for butter and sausage wrappers, etc.  The making of this paper required a lot of acid, and at periods this acid would escape into Chester Creek and poison thousands of fish, or all the fish then in the stream.

                The factory would make an ideal location for almost any manufacturing industry, as it is in fair condition with many houses for help, and having a modern steam power plant.  But it is not probable that paper will ever be made there again, and the passing of the Glen Mills paper mill removes the last exposition of the community’s one time all-important branch of industry.
 

 
 



Sunday, August 11, 2019

Tully Golf Course and Slinky Historical Marker

The above aerial view shows a little part of the Tully Golf Course that included the putting greens. The parking lot and white building are still standing and many of you pass it everyday especially on Sunday. Any guesses? You will be surprised where it is.

 
 
 
 

Note: Starting with the Springhaven Golf Club, golf courses began to pop up everywhere in the 1920's in Delaware Co. Most of the courses are still here but some like Ridley Park, Glendale and Tully are no longer with us. The Tully Golf Course in Darby Twp. was unusual because it was owned by the Tully Memorial Church in Sharon Hill. It closed about 1950. Anyone who caddied there, I would like to talk to get a rough idea of the layout of the course which covered the Briarcliffe section of Darby Twp.

 
 
 
 
 
CHESTER TIMES – April 29, 1925

 CHURCH COUNTRY CLUB TO OPEN

Tully Memorial Congregation to Play Golf by July 4

          Grading work and other detail necessary in providing a country club and golf course, which is the plan of the Tully Memorial Church, Sharon Hill, is progressing rapidly and Rev. Alexander Mackie, pastor of the Sharon Hill Presbyterian edifice, hopes to have the recreational center opened on July 4.
          The proposed golf grounds are located at Ashland Avenue and Academy Road, Darby Township.  The plot, which is owned by the church, comprises forty-seven acres.  The grading of the grounds is now under way.
          The plan was developed by Rev. Mackie and as was first told in the Times several months ago, it is intended to open the clubhouse and course at a small fee to members of the congregation and to residents of the Sharon Hill section.
          “We purchased an old farm a short time ago near Glenolden,” Dr. Mackie said today, “to see what could be done best to interest the people of our church in out-of-door life.
          “I believe it is the function of a church to minister to the physical as well as to the spiritual needs of humanity,” he said.
          According to Dr. Mackie, it is the first attempt on the part of a church and congregation to effect the building of a golf course as a part of the church program, although the Episcopal Church of Saint Luke and the Epiphany, Philadelphia, several years ago, opened a church farm at Broomall, this county.
          The officers of the new club are as follows:  President, John G. Brainerd; vice president, W. H. Kirkpatrick; treasurer, H. C. Bock; secretary, John A. Smith.
          A golf course, a Baseball field and half a dozen tennis courts are to be made a part of the new center and later it is hoped to have a swimming pool built.  James Reid is in charge of the property at the present time.  It is planned to convert the old homestead on the grounds into a modern first-class clubhouse.
         
No photo description available.
 


Monday, August 5, 2019

Woodrow Wilson Park dedicated in 1924 !! or 1929? Please read


 I want to see how many of you recognize this building which is still standing and what it is today. The building looks the same and is on a major road. A postcard c.1925

 
 
 
 
Note: I have been doing research on WW1 memorials in Delco for upcoming articles and came across the one from November of 1924. The official Nether Providence Twp. website information on Woodrow Wilson Park and the memorial is directly below, it appears the township has some misinformation. 
 
 
 
 

Woodrow Wilson Park

Ronaldson St & Allen St
Wallingford, PA 19086
This half-acre pocket park at Ronaldson and Allen Streets in South Media was officially established in 1979 as a memorial for those who served in World War I. The tract was originally presented to the township in 1929 by prominent attorney and township resident A. B. Geary and his family. It offers playground equipment. 
 
 
 
 
 
          CHESTER TIMES – November 10, 1924

PERSHING PRAISED AT DEDICATION OF COUNTY MEMORIAL 

 Judge Dickinson Speaker at Nether Providence Playground

          “Out of every war there has come a great man,” said Judge O. B. Dickinson of the United States District Court, speaking at the dedication Saturday afternoon of the new playgrounds presented to the Nether Providence Township by A. B. Geary and family.  “As yet the American people have failed to give recognition to the man who so valiantly led our boys to victory, a man who I consider as one of the greatest generals who has ever lived, and that man is no other than General John J. Pershing.  As yet the American people have failed to give the recognition he so rightly deserves.
          Judge Dickinson was the principal speaker at the exercises.
          The park, which bears the name “Woodrow Wilson Park” is located in South Media opposite the South Media School and is to be used as a recreation park by the girls and boys of the township.
          Mr. Geary, in presenting the grounds to the school board and the service men recalled the days back in 1917 when the boys were leaving for the various camps.  It very often became his duty to accompany these men to camp and he made a resolve that he would do something for the boys when they returned and in doing this something he resolved to do a thing which would perpetuate their memory for all time.  When the boys were back he explained this desire to Mrs. Geary and his son and daughter and they expressed themselves as being in perfect accord with his plan to make this remembrance in the form of a recreation park.
          Mrs. Geary then explained the contents of the deed to the property stating that the park was to be used as a recreation park and was to be under the supervision of the school board and the serviced men “because while the service men will be with us for a great many years to come, they must at some time pass away but our school board will be succeeded by another and so on down through the history of the nation there shall always be someone to see that this memory of the boys will be perpetuated.”
          In accepting the playground on behalf of the school board, John C. Hershey, president of that body paid the highest tribute to Mr. Geary and his family for the beautiful thought they had expressed in making the gift and admonished the children of the township to use the park for the purpose intended for by so doing they could carry out the wishes of the doers and at the same time they would be building up their minds and bodies in a manner which would enable them to better cope with the many obstacles that will present themselves in their future lives.
          T. Earle Palmer then made the speech of acceptance on behalf of the service men of the township.  Mr. Palmer brought out the point that the duty of the service men did not end with the signing of the Armistice but stressed the importance of helping to carry out the principles under which this county was founded and of the necessity of ever adhering to the high ideals of the Constitution.
          The closing address was delivered by Judge Dickinson, who took as his topic the poem of Longfellow, “The Village Blacksmith,” explaining that behind the surface of this masterpiece there was a wonderful lesson.  “The poem is symbolic of three things, first, the tree represents this widespread nation, second, the shop is symbolic of the resources of the nation and last and most important, the mighty smithy represented the manpower of the nation.
          “It is by just such places as this playground that this manpower is produced and it was this that made Greece one of the most powerful nations that ever existed, for that nation required that each of its subjects must be physically fit.”
          Speaking further the judge recalled a verse he had recited in his school boy days, the closing lines of which were a testimonial of the faith of the people in the institutions of the nation, that they would survive the unrest that prevailed at that time.  “And so,” said the judge, “I am firmly convinced now as then the country will live on and her institutions will survive any unrest that might prevail now.”
          The ceremony opened with the singing of America by all present, the signing being led by Watson Davis, community song leader of Frankford and who was attached to the Y. M. C. A. during the war.  There was an interesting musical program in which two members of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra took part.  Rev. Edward Reily, pastor of the Wallingford Presbyterian Church offered the opening prayer.
          In the North West corner of the playground is a beautiful granite boulder bearing the inscription, “Woodrow Wilson Park” under which appears the following:  “Erected to the memory of the boys from Nether Providence Township, who served in the World War.”


Monday, July 29, 2019

Mill Year in Delco!! Glen Mills Paper Mills closes

A rare aerial view from the 1920's of the Glen Mills Paper Mills right before it closed.

 
 
 
 
NOTE: This year is Delco Mills History year. Later this year there will be talks, tours etc. of old mills in Delaware Co. The Glen Mills paper Mills one of the oldest the county closed almost 100 years ago.
 
 
 

GLEN MILLS PAPER MILLS A MEMORY

Plant Being Dismantled and Machinery Moved Elsewhere

                It now looks, reports a correspondent, as though the Glen Mills Paper Mills will soon be only a memory of industrial life in that section of Delaware County, the Chester Creek Valley.  The big paper plant has been shut down for several months, but now the machinery is being removed and shipped away and the place dismantled, which would seem to indicate that the Glen Mills Paper Mill will soon be a thing of the past.
                For many years this industry was operated day and night, and was always a hive of industry, providing employment to a small army of contented workers, most of whom live in tenement houses on the premises.  The Glenn Mills Paper Mill was built in 1838 by James M. Willcox who was at that time operating the paper mill at Ivy Mills, built by his ancestors in 1729.  In this factory at Glen Mills was made all the paper used in making currency and bonds for the United States Government, for Mr. Willcox had invented a secret process in making paper which made counterfeiting very difficult.  So great was the success of this new invention that the government had many guards and secret service men on duty all the time at Glen Mills, to prevent any tampering or loss through any of the paper getting into other hands.  Orders were also turned out for foreign governments, and until the Willcox paper was improved upon by the New England mills, all the paper money in this country was made at Glen Mills.
                So great was the demand for it that another mill was built there, but that has fallen into ruin from disuse many years ago.  When the Glen Mills mills were built in 1836, there was more paper made in Delaware County than in all the rest of the United States combined.  The natural water power and clear water made this creek the source of the country’s paper supply. 
The present Yorkshire Mills were then making paper, John B. Duckett being then the maker.  It was he who built the present big mansion now on the premises.  The West Branch mills were also then operated by the Mattsons, as a paper mill.
                For the past twenty-five years the Glen Mills paper mills had been conducted by the Dohans, under the trade name of Glen Mills Paper Company, whose offices are in the Drexel buildings in Philadelphia.  Its last product was a patent parchment paper, used for butter and sausage wrappers, etc.  The making of this paper required a lot of acid, and at periods this acid would escape into Chester Creek and poison thousands of fish, or all the fish then in the stream.
                The factory would make an ideal location for almost any manufacturing industry, as it is in fair condition with many houses for help, and having a modern steam power plant.  But it is not probable that paper will ever be made there again, and the passing of the Glen Mills paper mill removes the last exposition of the community’s one time all-important branch of industry.


Sunday, July 21, 2019

2019 is the Year of the Mill in Delco!! The Milbourne Mill closes and a town begins

 
 

The Milbourne Mills were torn down about 1912 after closing in 1907 and the site became a Sears Store at 63rd and Market Sts. The Sears was torn down after it closed in 1988 and the site is now empty. The above print is from 1875.

 
 

Note: 2019 is the year of the mill in Delco. Later this year there will be talks, tours etc. about mills in the area and their history. The Milbourne Mills were owned by the Sellers Family for over 150 years. Mills began closing rapidly from the late 1890's thru the 1930's as eastern Delaware County went from rural to urban in rapid fashion.

 

 
 

FAMOUS MILBOURNE MILLS COMPANY GOES TO THE WALL 

 

 Upper Darby Concern Fails after a Prosperous Business Career of One Hundred and Fifty Years and the Collapse a Surprise to Owner and Creditors – Court Asked to Appoint a Receiver

            The Milbourne Mills Company, whose bit plant is located on Cobb’s Creek in Upper Darby Township, has encountered financial disaster.
            James W. Bayard, as counsel for the estates of William Sellers, John Sellers and other creditors of the company, filed a petition in bankruptcy in the United States District Court yesterday.  Application will be made for the appointment of a receiver today.
            This old flour milling concern, which is going to the wall at the instance of those most closely associated with it, has a remarkable history.  The plant stands on ground which William Penn conveyed to Samuel Sellers in 1682.  It was in 1757 that the business began, with the erection of a small grist mill by John Sellers, a grandson of Samuel.
            Since then the Milbourne Mills have continued an unbroken career until they were closed last Monday night.  In 1885 the business was incorporated as the Milbourne Mills Company.  The capitalization is nominal, only $136,000.  William and John Sellers estimate the plant to be worth $500,000.  It has a capacity of 1,500 barrels of flour a day.
            That the affairs of the Milbourne Mills Company were in bad shape was a complete surprise to the owners and chief creditors.  The facts upon which the board of directors acted at a special meeting held yesterday was not made public property until Monday.
            ACTED TO PROTECT INTERESTS – When John G. Johnson, who is an executor of the estate of John Sellers, was told the conditions, he agreed that prompt action should be taken to protect all interests concerned.  It was first intended to file an equity bill in Common Pleas Court, but yesterday the plan was changed.
            In the petition filed in the United States District Court, it is stated that the liabilities of the Milbourne Mills Company, other than miscellaneous accounts, aggregate $751,000, as follows:  Unsecured loan from the estate of John Sellers, $280,000; similar loan from the estate of William Sellers, $140,000; loans from financial institutions on demand notes, some of them with collateral security, $161,000; loans from financial institutions on paper discounted, $170,000.
            It is explained that the Sellers’ investment in the Milbourne Mills Company is entirely apart from that in William Sellers & Co., Inc., and in the Midvale Steel Company, so that neither of these great concerns is in any way involved in the Milbourne trouble.
            Accompanying this unexpected action there is much bad feeling against Richard S. Dewees, who, as president of the company since January, 1902, virtually has conducted the business alone.
            It appears that for fifteen years at least there had been no auditing of the company’s books until a few days ago, when Meyer Goldsmith, a public accountant, was engaged by the board of directors.  It was upon his statement, that the board passed the resolution that the company could not pay its debts.  The quick assets are placed at $175, 000.  This does not include the value of the plant.
            It is understood that the application to be made today for appointment of a receiver will allege “gross mismanagement” by the president “misrepresentation as to the value of stocks” and impropriety in entering into contracts for 44,700 barrels of flour”.
            Since these contracts were made the price of wheat has advanced from 20 to 25 cents a bushel.  As an excuse for the failure, it is intimated that the Pennsylvania has discriminated against the Milbourne, but it will be remembered that the company enjoyed and still has the milling-in-transit privilege, which, the railroad withheld from the Atlantic Flour Mills Company, which consequently never went into operation.
            When seen last night at his Haverford home, just after the Unites States deputy marshal had served the papers, R.S. Dewees, president of the company, was greatly depressed and very nervous.
            “I do not want to say anything about the matter now, nor until after advising with counsel, so I ask to be excused,” said Mr. Dewees.
            “It is charged, Mr. Dewees, that your management of the Milbourne Mills has been bad.”
            “All I can say is that I have done the best I could under very difficult and highly discouraging conditions.”
            “As a reason for the present unfortunate result, Mr. Dewees, it is said, that the Pennsylvania has discriminated against the Milbourne Mills.”
            “Well, there is nothing I want to say upon that matter at this time.  Later something may develop.”
            “I remember, Mr. Dewees, that as a witness before the Interstate Commerce Commission in the differential proceeding about three years ago, you said in exporting flour the Milbourne Mills had trouble in doing so from Philadelphia, because of the high switching charge to the water front, and that for this reason you exported through New York and there had to meet sharp competition from the Northwest.”
            “You have about the right understanding of our position in that respect.  I need not talk more about it now.”
            “While not directly charged, it is broadly intimated, Mr. Dewees, that some things appear not to be entirely straight in the Milbourne management.”
            “Do they say that?  Then there is all the greater reason why I should say nothing now, but only at the proper time, and then with advice of counsel.”
            “Did the petition in bankruptcy surprise you, Mr. Dewees?”
            “Not after the feeling that has been shown in the last few days.  This action was uncalled for.  There was a way out of it.  I will appear to be represented at the hearing in court tomorrow.”
            BEARS EXCELLENT REPUTATION – A member of the Society of Friends and long a respected member of the Commercial Exchange, where he has always enjoyed the highest reputation, Mr. Dewees’ lives in simple and inexpensive style.  His friends spurn the idea that his management is not strictly honest.
            Other officers of the Milbourne Mills Company are:  Howard Sellers, vice president; Frank K. Miller, treasurer, and A.P. Husband, secretary.  The directors are R.S. Dewees, Frank K. Miller and representing the controlling Sellers’ interest, Howard Sellers, William F. Sellers, Charles B. Dunn, A. Merritt, Taylor and George A. Fairlamb.
            The Milbourne Mills Company ranks as fifth in the Association of Centenary Firms and Corporations of the United States.  Francis Perot’s Sons Malting Company of Philadelphia, founded in 1687, heads the list.
           
           
 


Monday, July 15, 2019

From private golf course to Concord Twp. Club! Lots going on this week see below!!

 

I hope a Concord Twp. resident recognizes this farm. It is a postcard from about 1915. Please email me Thanks Keith      keith106@rcn.com

 
 
 

Note: Golf courses were all the rage in the early 20th century in Delco. Golf Clubs were popping up everywhere. The Concord Twp Club Course was originally a private 9 hole course for the Martin Family.

 
 
 

BRINTON LAKE CLUB BUYS MARTIN LANDS 

 Pays $175,000 for the Mansion and Tract of 216 Acres

          The Brinton Lake Club has purchased the property owned by Joseph J. Martin, consisting of two hundred and sixteen acres of land, located in Concord Township, at the intersection of the Baltimore Pike and the Wilmington West Chester Pike, commonly known as “Painter’s Crossroads.”  Besides this vast stretch of land, the property includes the beautiful Martin mansion, known as Robin’s Lawn and Brookfield Farm.
          By this acquisition of land, the Brinton Lake Club owns a total of three hundred and seventy-eight acres, in what is considered one of the best sections of Delaware County, easily accessible to Wilmington, West Chester and Chester people, to say nothing of intermediate points.
          There is on the acquired property a nine-hole golf course, built by Mr. Martin for his own private use.  However, an entirely new eighteen hole course is to be constructed, the plans for which are being prepared by William S. Flynn of Ardmore.  The latter is a golf architect of note.  He states that the land addition will give the Brinton Lake Club one of the best golf courses in the East.
          The “Summer Colony” privilege, as originally planned, will be accorded members of the club, which will include the advantages of the beautiful lake.
          Extensive alterations and additions are to be made to the Martin mansion, plans for which are being prepared by Norman Hulme, architect, Philadelphia.  When all the improvements have been made, the club will have a house it is stated, as fine as any in the vicinity of Philadelphia, all of which will tend to increase the membership to a gratifying extent, it is believed.
          This choice property has been a show place of the northwest section of Delaware County for a long time.  Few, however, ever dreamed of it becoming the recreational spot that is outlined.  The property was held at $175,000, and the sale was consummated by T. W. Read, Chester, and Hirst and Martin, Philadelphia.
          This club, though but a year old, has won much favor in the way of membership and popularity.  It owes its existence to what is considered the farsightedness of Elwood J. Turner, Esq., and Fred M. Schwalm of this city.
 
 
 
If you are interested in local history, Please join the group below. I'm the president
and we promote local events, programs etc.
Thanks Keith
 
 
 

Monday, July 8, 2019

Ridley Township boxing leader James F. Dougherty!!

 

James F. "Baron" Dougherty [1868-1948] was involved in all phases of Leiperville and Ridley Township. He personally started the J. F. Dougherty Fire Co. which later became the Vauclain Fire Co. Dougherty is on the right.

Note: When I first became interested in local history, Ridley Township history especially, several older residents told me Jack Dempsey, 1920's heavyweight champ, trained in Leiperville on his way to the top. He trained with James F. "Baron" Dougherty. Originally I never believed the story, but it is true. Dougherty ran the Colonial Hotel on Chester Pike and Dempsey and other boxers trained there. Below is an interview with Dougherty from 1923

JIMMY DOUGHERTY DESCRIBES CAREER 

 

 

 

Has Been in Fight Game for Five Years

 

CHESTER TIMES – June 27, 1923 – JIMMY DOUGHERTY DESCRIBES CAREER – Has Been in Fight Game for Five Years – Fought as Middleweight
          For a man approaching fifty-three years of age, Jimmy Dougherty, Baron of Leiperville, is a remarkably well-preserved man with a family of seven children and does not at all look his age.
          Dougherty gives credit for his robust health and youthful appearance to athletics.  In his early days Jimmy was a star baseball player who later fought professionally.
          But now his activities in ring matters are confined to refereeing, managing and promoting.  In refereeing Dougherty has made probably his greatest name.  His fame is nationwide.  Thus his selection as third man in the ring when Jack Dempsey hauls off to sock Tom Gibbons in their heavyweight championship tilt at Shelby, Mont., July 4th.
          For close to thirty-five years Dougherty has been associated with the boxing game.  He has seen star mittmen of two generations pass along the beaten trail and believes that the old timers were just as good as any modern boxer and vice versa.
          Jimmy doesn’t take the stand that the “good old days” were the best.  He thinks the modern heavyweight would be as successful as the old timers and there’s positively no way of comparing them.
          But Dougherty does bring out points seldom touched upon.  He maintains that while the oldest were great they would no doubt have been greater if they lived during the present generation.
          NO $100,000 PURSES YEARS AGO – “In those days glory was the most thing they got,” said Dougherty, “while today the modern preliminary boxer gets what the old timers thought a fortune.  Money makes the mare go and were the stars of other days to be battling in these times of big purses look at the incentive they would have to spur them on.
          “And again, conditions are different.  The old fellows had to ‘sneak’ around and fight in seclusion.  They virtually had to go in hiding, the fight game was in such disrepute.  They seldom had time to train.
          “But the modern boxer has the advantage of public appreciation; official approval in almost every state in the union.  It’s a business now with weeks and weeks devoted to training periods for big fights.
          “I’ve seen some great fighters pass in review and wouldn’t care to relegate any of them to rear places in a comparison to modern pugilists.  Neither would I place Jack Dempsey, Tom and Mike Gibbons, Benny Leonard, Lew Tendler, O’Dowd, Packey McFarland, Leach Cross, Johnny Dundee, Johnny Kilbane, and a host of other more modern fighters behind the old fellows.
          WAS A PUPIL OF BILLY MCLEAN – “I was just eighteen years old when I first became mixed up in the fight game.  I then lived in Chester where I was born and used to walk to Philadelphia several times a week to take boxing lessons from Professor Billy McLean, one of the greatest ring masters of all time.
          “I was fairly husky and fought as a middleweight.  Everything I knew was taught by McLean who today well beyond the eighty-year mark is remarkably well preserved.  There was a good class of fighters being tutored by McLean who staged the first boxing ever arranged in Delaware County when I was around twenty years of age.
          “Because I am called ‘Jimmy the Wrestler’ many people think I was a professional grappler but I earned that title in a baseball game and I still hear it today from the old fellows.  We were playing baseball in Chester one day and Jimmy Murray now, an umpire in the Pacific Coast League, was catching for the opposition.
          “The squeeze play was given and I came dashing in from third so hard I bowled over Murray and a free for all started between us with me hauling and pulling Murray around more like wrestling than boxing.  The name of ‘Jimmy the Wrestler’ was tacked on then.
          “My first professional fight was with Andy Black, a former amateur middleweight champion.  We fought at Darby in the only fight ever staged there.  I didn’t remain in the fight game as a participant very long but turned manager to handle Eddie Lenny whom I think was one of the greatest fighters of any weight ever developed in Philadelphia.
          “Lenny was a marvel.  He mixed with some of the greatest fighters of the day and fought one twenty-five rounder for Tom O’Rouke in New York against George Dixon which I think Lenny won by a wide margin.
          “I also handled Jack Bonner, the Summit Hill fighter.  He was a good one and staged his best fight in Louisville, Ky., against Kid Carter, losing in twenty rounds.  I was instrumental in bringing Joe Goddard, a powerful black man from South Africa to fight John L. Sullivan, but before Goddard could get a whack at John L. the latter was beaten by Jim Corbett.
          GODDARD A POWERFUL FIGHTER – “Goddard’s first fight for me resulted in a knockout victory over Peter Maher in Williamsport.  Goddard was fast, strong as a bull and could give and take with the best big men in the land at the time.  It was a pity he never got a chance to match his skill, speed and punching power with the old champion, Sullivan.
          “While here Goddard offered $50,000 to any man who could knock him out with one punch.  By that he meant he would stand perfectly still with his hands hanging at his sides and permit anyone to sock him.  No one ever accepted his challenge.  Later he became disgusted with conditions here and returned to South America.
          “It was in 1890 that I first established training quarters for boxers at Leiperville and became acquainted with Joe Gans.  There was a remarkable person.  Gans was clean, intelligent and a gentleman all the way through.  That’s why he was spoken of so highly by everyone who knew him.
          “Gans was a ring master who devoted his entire thought to perfecting himself in his chosen profession.  Her studied his opponent’s every characteristic and laid out his plans for a fight like a general does before a battle.  Joe always trained at my place and I saw him time after time box as many as twenty rounds a day in preparing for a six or ten round fight.
          “I believe his idea of working twenty for a ten or a six round tilt was a mighty good idea.
          “Probably the greatest fight ever waged in Pennsylvania was fought in 1905 between Sam Langford and Jack Blackburn.  They went fifteen rounds at Leiperville and that contest was a masterpiece of ring work on the part of both, who were skilled ring men.  For their terrific fifteen round struggle they split $60.
          “From 1905 until 1912 I forgot all about boxing.  I wasn’t connected with it in any way, not even attending a contest.  However, in 1912 when touring the Eastern Pennsylvania, I met Jack Blackburn then doing time for murder.  He begged me to get him released.
          “I started a movement which eventually brought his case before the Board of Pardons, but it was refused at the time.  This cost me a lot of money, and when Blackburn was eventually released, I decided to return to boxing and by directing Blackburn, regain some of my money.
          “Though I was associated with many boxers, I really never managed any but Lenny until during the war, when I was staging boxing shows for the benefit of the Chest fund in Chester.  There I became acquainted with Bobby Barrett.
          “Barrett impressed me as being one of the greatest hitting boys his weight I ever saw and I took him under my direction.
          “I’ve refereed for many years and handled bouts in which some of the country’s stars competed.  I refereed several times for Joe Gans, one of which was a title bout in Baltimore against Jack Daly.  I counted Daly out.
          “Refereeing is a serious proposition and a man must keep his wits about him all the time and know the rules thoroughly.  Snap judgment must be used and the proper decision given the instant something happens.  It’s like in baseball.  Action must be prompt.  There is no time to ponder.”